Tropical Fruit in the Desert

 

Even though we live in the desert, I can wheel my cart right up to the offerings from a tropical isle.

When we lived in California, the persimmons were plentiful at this time of year, so I experimented with them some. The Fuyu variety was eaten when sort of crispy; not as crisp as an apple, but with a satisfying bite and texture. A few thin slices in a salad just screamed “California”! So unique!!

The Hachiya variety was loads of fun! I would put one or two out on the counter and watch them turn into pseudo water balloons as they ripened. When they were to the point of being jelly-like, they were ready! But to eat them . . . well, it was best to stand over the sink with an abundance of mouth-wiping cloths at hand!

The ones pictured were MUCH smaller than the ones we got in California, and the price at two dollars each puts them pretty much out of reach. I might try a Hachiya for old times’ sake one of these days, though!

I did spring for a plaintain, so am tracking down likely recipes to bring that to the table soon.

Top to bottom:

Coconuts

Mangoes

Plantains

Two kinds of persimmons:  Fuyu and Hachiya

Kiwis 

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About judilyn

RV'er, foody, caregiver, knowledge seeker
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5 Responses to Tropical Fruit in the Desert

  1. taphian says:

    You really have a great offer in the desert. I love all of these wonderful fruits. Tried to plant a persimmon tree in Greece 3 times, but didn’t work. But we get these fruits here quite cheep and pomegranates etc. etc. Have a nice day, regards Mitza

    • judilyn says:

      We don’t really have access to local fruits like you see in the picture. They are imported from California and other countries. We have a lot of apples grown here, and winter squashes.

      • taphian says:

        well, apples and winter squashes are very healthy

      • judilyn says:

        Yes they are! I am cooking a spaghetti squash in my slow cooker today. I have found that this method is easier than using the oven to bake it, and the result is more even. No need to heat up a whole oven just to bake a piece of squash. The nice man in the produce department kindly cuts the squash in half for me so I can scrape out the seeds before cooking.

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